Who works harder, teachers or students?

The reality; everyone is working just as hard as everyone else.

Peyton Escalante and Haley Haltam

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    The anxiety of receiving a test back is normal, but have you ever forgotten you took a test because a teacher takes weeks to grade it? Many students have a job, participate in extracurricular activities, and take multiple college and advanced placement classes. These students work extremely hard, yet some don’t receive the same amount of hard work back from their fellow teachers. However, what many students don’t consider is that some teachers are doing just as much them, and sometimes more. 

     Mr. Propps coaches girls tennis, boys tennis, and boys swim, along with teaching economics, human geography, government, and an upcoming online college class. This is all on top of his personal life as well. 

“Myself comes first. I do enough outside of school, but there’s a good portion I dedicate to myself just for my mental stability,” Propps says. 

This raises a question: If teachers can take time off for mental breaks, can students as well?  Many teachers work with their students’ schedules. For example, at the beginning of the year, Propps gives a survey to all of his students to get an understanding of what activities they are involved in. 

     However, for some students, all they can count on is themselves. Landon Doty, a junior at Shawnee Heights High School, takes five AP classes in one semester, is a member of the band which includes marching, jazz, pep, and symphonic, participates in the school musical, is a member of three school clubs, and has a job. Doty has to rely on himself to stay organized and get everything done. 

      “I keep a digital calendar of all the events I have going on, then I keep a notebook of when assignments are due, what I did everyday in class, then I keep a little journal, per say, just to organize my thoughts, and what I learned that day,” Doty said.  

      He also says that organization is a major key. It takes time to organize your thoughts and get everything done but it’s extremely helpful. 

      One thing Mr. Propps and Doty can agree on is the lack of communication between the two generations. Teachers have lives outside of school and students could assume less. We all have busy lives, but understanding could give everyone a little relief.