Learning is work

Superintendent Martin Stessman

Superintendent Martin Stessman

Dr. Stesman

Learning is work. In school it helps if the student has a good relationship with his or her teacher and is genuinely interested in the subject matter. Those conditions are ideal but not required for a student to learn. What is important, however, is for the student to value the learning and to have the grit and determination to continue working on their education even when it is difficult work. Perseverance is as important, or perhaps even more important, than intelligence. When combined, the two ingredients definitely pay off. There is a direct, positive correlation between education and earning potential.
According to statistics published by the Bureau of Labor Statistics for 2014, a high school graduate earned $668 per week, while a person with an associates degree earned $792 per week. College graduates with a bachelor’s degree earned $1,101 weekly and those with a Master’s Degree earned $1,326 on average. Those with more advanced professional degrees averaged $1,639 per week. Clearly, the more you learn, the more you can earn. Data on employment also supports the importance of education. High school dropouts experienced an unemployment rate of 9% compared to 6% for high school graduates, 4.5% for those with an associates degree and just 3.5% for those with a Bachelors Degree. Just 2.8% of people with a Masters Degree were unemployed while less than 2% of those with an advanced professional degree were looking for work.
As a student in high school or college you will take classes you don’t like from teachers you don’t relate to. The difference between successful students and unsuccessful students is that successful students are able to work and learn anyway because they see the long term benefit of doing so. Learning isn’t all about working for your teacher. It is about working for your future, and your future is worth it.